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Student Panel Abstracts and Bios

 

10:15 a.m.–11:15 a.m.
Translation Histories: Access and Adaptations of New Ideologies in the Global Iberian World

 

Translation greatly expands the reach of new ideas, providing access to more people and cultures. Additionally, the moment of translation can also create the opportunity for a new ideology or philosophy to become adapted to local factors. In this student panel, undergraduates from UMass Boston will present original research related to the theme of ideas adapted through translation into Spanish. Hugh McLaughlin will study the text and context of the first Spanish language translation of the US Constitution by Venezuelan independence leader Manuel Garcia de Sena. Thomas Noe, Jr. will analyze the Spanish and Italian translations of The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis in the context of adapting a Protestant text for a Catholic audience in the field of contemporary religious philosophy. Nathalie Pacas will present on “Translation as a Revolutionary Act: Latin American Independence Movements and Translating Texts for New Republics.” Carlos Valencia will present his paper, “Spanish Biblical Translation: Idiomatic Hispanization and Resisting Catholic Control,” discussing a 16th century Spanish translator of the Bible.

 

Hugh McLaughlin is a senior at UMB completing a major in sociology and a minor in Spanish; living in Buenos Aires sparked his interest in Spanish. Thomas Noe, Jr. is a senior at the University of Massachusetts Boston completing his bachelor’s degree in the Translation Studies Track in Latin American and Iberian Studies. In addition to Spanish, Tom also speaks Italian. Nathalie Pacas is a senior at UMB in the Language, Culture, and Society Track of the Latin American and Iberian Studies major with a deep interest in Latin American history. Originally from Colombia, Carlos Valencia is a senior at UMB in the Translation Studies Track of the Latin American and Iberian Studies major. Dr. Isabel Gómez (assistant professor, UMB) will chair their panel.

 

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.
Access to the Translation and Interpretation Industries for Spanish-Speakers in the USA

 

What factors limit or condition access to the translation and interpretation industries in the US? In this student panel, undergraduates from UMass Boston will present original research on the availability of published translations and interpretation services for the growing population of US-based Spanish speakers and bilinguals. In her paper, “Translations from Spanish and the 3% Problem in the USA Publishing Market,” Sofia Falcón will consider the factors limiting the number of translations published by the largest publishing companies while the translations published by small presses and online venues continue to find new readers. Joel García will discuss US Latino attitudes towards health and masculinity in his paper, “Medical Interpreters Serving US Latino Cultures: Vulnerability and Confidentiality.” Lastly, David Manning will discuss “Jorge Luis Borges and Translation Rights: The Case of Norman Thomas di Giovanni vs. María Kodama,” in which cultural and legal factors resulted in one translator supplanting another.

 

Sofia Falcón is a sophomore double-majoring in Early Education and Care in Inclusive Settings through the College of Education and Human Development and in the Translation Studies Track of the Latin American and Iberian Studies major in the College of Liberal Arts. Joel García is a senior majoring in sociology with an interest in bilingual communities in the USA David Manning is a senior at UMB pursuing a major in English with a Spanish minor; he plans to pursue a career as an educator. Dr. Isabel Gómez (assistant professor, Latin American and Iberian Studies, UMB) will chair their panel.

 

 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Literary Translation and Language Accessibility: Register, Race, and Gender

Literary translators must contend with the dense constructions of identities through language—identities often conditioned by the linguistic registers through which factors of race, gender, class, education level, and more are performed and policed. In this student panel, undergraduates from UMass Boston will present original research relating literary register in translation to factors of race, gender, and accessibility. Kyla Corvino will present on “Gendered Metaphors of Translation” and consider the feminizing of translations both faithful and faithless. Clarita Prudencio will study the most recent translation of Don Quixote by Edith Grossman and consider the effects of Grossman’s mixing of a foreignizing, past-inflected register in the prologue with an updated “modern” English approach to the main text. Alexanderia Texeira will present a comparative analysis of two English translations of a short story, “The Smallest Woman in the World” by Brazilian author Clarice Lispector, considering the different recreations by Elizabeth Bishop and Katrina Dodson of the title character as a colonial subject and racialized other.

 Kyla Corvino is a senior at the University of Massachusetts Boston double-majoring in Exercise and Health Sciences through the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and in the Translation Studies Track of the Latin American and Iberian Studies major in the College of Liberal Arts. Clarita Prudencio is a junior at UMB double-majoring in Early Education and Care in Inclusive Settings through the College of Education and Human Development and in the Translation Studies Track of the Latin American and Iberian Studies major. Alexanderia Texeira is a senior at UMB pursuing her degree in the Latin American and Iberian Studies department.

 

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
More about My Major: Language Majors on Translation Courses

Chaired by Dr. Regina Galasso


 3:15 p.m.–415 p.m.
The Stakes of Internship Programs

 Launching a translation career usually takes three to 12 months of hard work after graduation. The environment in which this transitional period is spent may have a lasting impact on one’s future career.

 This session focuses on the major challenges early-career translators face—from receiving useful feedback on their work in real-life projects to avoiding exploitative schemes and building their own relational capital. We will discuss the findings of a survey on the early-career transition period run among graduating students and professional translators and analyze a number of different working environments, including the paid internship program set up by the speaker and the French humanitarian NGO Solidarités International in 2009. Finally, we will explore the possibility of scaling up this program through a collaboration among professional associations, universities, and nonprofits.

 Attila Piróth, “Einstein’s Hungarian translator,” is a freelance scientific and technical translator with a PhD in physics. In 2007, he set up a translation team for the French humanitarian NGO Solidarités International, and to date has mentored 14 early-career translators (including two NETA members) in a paid internship setup. He has run surveys on translation into a nonnative language and pro bono translation.

 Attila has held conference presentations and workshops in 16 countries. He lives in Bordeaux, France.

 

 

 
  

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